Your browser does not support JavaScript! or JavaScript is currently disabled.
Skip to main section

Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology

School of Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology degree program is designed to prepare learners for professional clinical psychology practice and eligibility to apply for clinical psychologist licensure in many states. Learners engage in a competency-based, scholar-practitioner curriculum that provides them with advanced practice preparation emphasizing the incorporation of scientific knowledge and inquiry into the development, application, and evaluation of ethical and culturally sensitive psychological assessments and interventions. The curriculum provides both online coursework and face-to-face residencies that focus on ethics, multicultural perspectives, supervision, clinical interviewing skills, cognitive and personality assessment, diagnosis and psychopathology, psychotherapy theory and treatment, and psychological report writing. Coursework, residency experiences, clinical training, and research are sequential, developmental, and graded in complexity to ensure that successful graduates gain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to form effective professional relationships; conduct appropriate psychological assessments; successfully implement evidence-based interventions; evaluate the outcomes of programs and therapeutic interventions; and engage in supervision, consultation, and advocacy related to the practice of clinical psychology.

Personal Suitability and Fitness for the Profession

Capella embraces the principles and guidelines set forth by the Council of Chairs of Training Councils (CCTC) related to professional psychology programs in that the faculty, training staff, supervisors, and administrators in the PsyD Clinical Psychology specialization have a professional, ethical, and potentially legal obligation to ensure, insofar as possible, that all learners have the competence to manage professional relationships in an effective and appropriate manner and that they possess the emotional maturity, interpersonal stability, and intellectual judgment required to work with vulnerable populations. Personal suitability and fitness for the profession includes but is not limited to demonstration of sufficient interpersonal and professional competence; self-awareness, self-reflection, and self-evaluation; openness to processes of supervision; and resolution of issues or problems that interfere with professional development or functioning in a satisfactory manner. Throughout the graduate training of each learner, faculty and staff are responsible for educating and assessing learners with regard to their personal suitability and fitness for the profession.

Residency Requirement(s):

Clinical Psychology year-in-residence. See university policy 3.04.05 Attendance at Residencies and the Residencies page on Campus for more information. Also see the PsyD Year-in-Residence section, below, and the Clinical Psychology year-in-residence courses.

 

Clinical Training Requirement(s):

Minimum of 1,000 practicum hours and 2,000 pre-doctoral internship hours. See the PsyD Clinical Training section, below, for more information.

Show course with description
PSY8001
Orientation to Professional Psychology

In this course, learners improve their ability to navigate the virtual campus and become familiar with library, career center, and writing center resources. Learners identify the educational steps necessary for successfully completing the doctoral degree program; review their specialization’s requirements, associated professional roles and organizations, and ethics and professional standards; and articulate a professional identity based on doctoral-level psychology training.  For PsyD in Clinical Psychology and PsyD in School Psychology learners only. Must be taken during the learner’s first quarter. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY5120
Social Psychology

This course provides an overview of how behavior is shaped and influenced within a social context. Within this framework, learners analyze interpersonal relationships, social cognition, social inference, emotion, and personality. Learners review and demonstrate their knowledge of the social psychology of decision making, attitude formation, and social attribution as they relate to contemporary issues. Learners also apply social psychological theory and research to various clinical, educational, and organizational settings.

5 quarter credits
PSY5410
History and Systems of Psychology

Learners in this course explore the historical and contemporary schools of psychology and gain an understanding of what constitutes the profession of psychology and their chosen specialization. Learners critique primary source material to develop an in-depth understanding of the evolution of various psychological theories and their implications for professional practice.

5 quarter credits
PSY5420
Multicultural Perspectives in Human Behavior

This course is an examination of substantive and theoretical issues concerning the cultural differences of individuals and groups and their influence on the practice of professional psychology. Learners explore the role of culture-specific programming, the needs and values of cultural subgroups, and approaches to providing psychological services to culturally diverse populations. Learners also critically analyze the interactions of multiple dimensions of diversity to better understand the ways in which individual differences contribute to professional psychological practice.

5 quarter credits
PSY6015
Lifespan Development

In this course, learners gain and apply knowledge of lifespan development from infancy through adulthood, including human development processes and milestones while considering individual and cultural differences. Learners evaluate theories and approaches for examining human development and analyze human development processes related to their specialization.

5 quarter credits
PSY7320
Advanced Biological Psychology

Learners in this course examine the biological factors related to psychopathology. The course emphasizes research problems and methods currently being explored in biological psychology. Topics include the role of genetic factors in psychopathology, the influence of physical and emotional trauma on brain function, biological considerations in treatment planning, addictive phenomena, and other clinically relevant subjects.  Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY7421
Cognitive/Affective Psychology

Learners in this course apply their knowledge of theoretical foundations and the basic principles and models of cognitive/affective psychology to mental processes, such as how individuals acquire, process, and store information; how they think, perceive, remember, and learn; and how they experience feelings, moods, and emotions. Learners also demonstrate the ways in which the integration of cognition and affect influence an individual’s behavior.

5 quarter credits
PSY8220
Advanced Psychopathology

In this course, learners examine theory and research associated with major psychological disorders, from the most common diagnostic concerns to dual diagnoses, comorbidity, and psycho-medical issues. Learners examine the concepts of psychopathology throughout the lifespan, then transition from studying DSM-5 concepts and terminology to evaluating clinical assessment and treatment situations. In particular, learners familiarize themselves with ways to apply theoretical concepts in a professional clinical setting while displaying sensitivity to ethical and diversity issues. Other course topics include the issues of “empirically validated” versus “evidence based” practice, the interaction of social and biological factors in etiology and treatment, and the interaction between complex Axis I and II disorders.  For PsyD learners only.

5 quarter credits
PSY8251 *
Neuropsychological Assessment

In this course, learners study current theories, research, and methods used in the neuropsychological assessment of various mental disorders in adults, children, and adolescents. Learners review various neuropsychological screening and assessment instruments, clinical interviewing methods, and neuropsychological test batteries that are commonly used in the evaluation and assessment of neuropsychological disorders. Learners are introduced to functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, as well as to common syndromes and disease processes that can impair the human brain and central nervous system functioning. In addition, learners investigate the role of emotional functioning and effort within the context of the overall neuropsychological assessment process and gain an understanding of how to write a neuropsychological report.  For PsyD learners only. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8206. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY8310
Theories of Psychotherapy

Learners in this course critically analyze the clinical techniques and intervention methods associated with major psychotherapy approaches. Learners examine the historical context, underlying assumptions, and appropriate applications of each approach and investigate current research associated with the therapeutic effectiveness of psychotherapy. Learners also synthesize course concepts to create an integrated model of psychotherapy and explore legal considerations, empirical support, and personal beliefs and attitudes regarding issues of diversity. For PsyD and PhD in Psychology learners only. There is a residency requirement associated with this course for PsyD Clinical Psychology learners.

5 quarter credits
PSY8371
Strategies of Clinical Supervision and Consultation

This course provides an overview of the theories, functions, and methods of clinical supervision, consultation, and advocacy. In particular, learners examine various styles of supervision, consultation, and advocacy; supervisory, consultative, and advocacy relationships; contractual issues; and ethical and legal issues associated with providing these services. Learners also review supervision, consultation, and advocacy research; apply their findings to relevant service delivery topics; and develop their own theories and approaches to clinical supervision. For PsyD Clinical Psychology and PsyD School Psychology learners only. There is a residency requirement associated with this course for PsyD Clinical Psychology learners.

5 quarter credits
PSY8501
Advanced Research Methods and Statistics for Professional Psychology

In this course, learners expand their knowledge of quantitative research design and methodology by studying the foundations, strategies, and practices of ethical research in the field of professional psychology. Learners engage in scholarly critical analysis and synthesis of current quantitative research and construct their own informal quantitative research proposal. Learners apply advanced statistical concepts and interpretation of statistical analyses to the evaluation and design of quantitative research and exchange critical, constructive project feedback with their peers. Research designs developed during this course may form the basis for the learner’s dissertation or School Psychology specialty topic proposal.  For PsyD learners only.

5 quarter credits
PSY8502 *
Advanced Research Design and Methodology for Professional Psychology

In this course, learners continue to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to integrate science and theory into the practice of professional psychology through the study of advanced qualitative research methods, applied theory research, and program development and evaluation. Learners critically analyze a variety of theories, tools, and techniques used in qualitative research, leading to the development of an informal qualitative research proposal. In particular, learners examine the design and development of clinical programs and interventions, with particular emphasis on community needs assessments, program design models, and program evaluation. Learners also practice applying a logic model to program design and evaluation and propose theoretical applications that address diversity issues in the evidence-based practice of psychology. Research designs developed during both this course and PSY8501 may form the basis for the learner’s dissertation. For PsyD Clinical Psychology learners only. Prerequisite(s): PSY8501.

5 quarter credits
PSY9909 *
Clinical Psychology Dissertation Preparation

Learners develop the research topic for their dissertation and propose their theoretical framework and research methodology for their identified research problem. Learners engage in the Institutional Review Board (IRB) ethics approval process to establish the ethical considerations and requirements for their research. For PsyD in Clinical Psychology learners only. Special permission is required for registration. Grading for this course is S/NS. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all required and elective coursework with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. Completion of practicum courses. Fulfillment of all residency requirements. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8200 *
The Helping Relationship and Techniques in Clinical Psychology

In this residency, learners analyze the therapeutic relationship and methods of building trust and rapport with clients through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners will engage in case discussions, role-plays, and group exercises to examine skills associated with relationship building and practice establishing ongoing working alliances with clients. Learners also assess diversity and ethical principles as they relate to the foundational components of an effective clinical interview. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent registration in PSY-R8203. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8203 *
Psychological Assessment 1: Cognitive, Achievement, and Adaptive Behavior

In this residency, learners practice assessment administration for cognitive, achievement, and adaptive behavior through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners assess client behavior through the administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized tests, including current versions of intelligence, achievement, adaptive behavior, and executive functioning assessments.  Prerequisite(s): Concurrent registration in PSY-R8200. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8206 *
Psychological Assessment 2: Personality and Mental Health

In this residency, learners develop diagnostic interviewing skills as well as personality and mental health assessment skills through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners apply diagnostic interviewing strategy in personality and clinical assessment to assess client behavior through the administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized tests, including current versions of personality assessments. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8200 and PSY-R8203. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8209 *
Integrated Psychological Report Writing and Case Conceptualization

Learners gain an understanding of case formulation and report writing in the digital space through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners use various theoretical approaches to form case conceptualizations, applying theory to understand client issues, how they are developed, and how they are sustained. Learners identify how theories are impacted when applied to a diverse set of clients and client issues. Learners also analyze how information gathered through clinical activities is used to build an integrated psychological report. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8206. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8212 *
Theory and Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Psychology

In this residency, learners strengthen their understanding of the application of theory and use of advanced skills and techniques through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners participate in case discussions, roleplay, and group exercises associated with effective treatment planning and develop treatment plans using empirically supported treatments, knowledge of treatment ethics, and respect for individual differences. Learners engage in practice activities that address empirically supported crisis intervention, social justice issues with diverse populations, and opportunities to self-evaluate and monitor skills and attitudes. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8209 and concurrent registration in PSY-R8215. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY-R8215 *
Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice in Clinical Psychology

Learners acquire an understanding of ethics and the standards of practice in clinical psychology through coursework and a face-to-face residency. During the face-to-face residency, learners reach practicum readiness through demonstration of clinical skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary for entry into practicum training. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8209 and concurrent registration in PSY-R8212. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits

Learners must register for PSY8950 a minimum of three times to fulfill their program requirements.

PSY8950 *
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Practicum

The doctoral practicum is a repeating course learners take to fulfill 1,000 required practicum hours. Learners work with their mentors and the director of clinical training to develop goals for the practicum experience that may include assessment, intervention, consultation, diagnosis, case conceptualization, research and evaluation, supervision, teaching, management, and administration. Learners then receive supervised, doctoral-level training at a practicum site and engage in concurrent online course activities that emphasize self-awareness, self-reflection, and self-evaluation; knowledge and application of evidence-based practice; competence to practice with diverse populations; and ethical and legal professional psychology standards. Work completed during this course will lead to the learner’s Clinical Competency Examination. For PsyD in Clinical Psychology learners only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): PSY5410, PSY5420, PSY6015, PSY8220, PSY8371, and all residency requirements. Approval of practicum application. All application materials must be received by the first day of the quarter preceding the quarter of the proposed start date. Refer to the current manual for further details. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

4 quarter credits

Learners must register for PSY9960 a minimum of two times to fulfill their program requirements.

PSY9960 *
Dissertation Courseroom

This course provides learners with resources, guidance, and peer and mentor support during each dissertation course as they complete the required milestones.  Department consent is required for registration. Grading for this course is S/NS. Learners must register for this course a minimum of four times to fulfill their specialization requirements. Prerequisite(s): PSY9909 or PSY9919. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

3 quarter credits

Learners must register for PSY9962 a minimum of four times to fulfill their program requirements.

PSY9962 *
Clinical Psychology Doctoral Internship

The doctoral internship is a repeating course learners take to fulfill a minimum of 2,000 required post-practicum internship hours. Learners receive supervised, doctoral-level professional psychology training at an internship site and engage in concurrent online course activities that monitor their internship experience; emphasize self-awareness, self-reflection, and self-evaluation; support knowledge and application of evidence-based practice; develop competence to practice with diverse populations; and emphasize ethical and legal professional psychology standards. For PsyD in Clinical Psychology learners only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): Completion of all doctoral practicum requirements. Approval of internship application. Refer to the current manual for additional requirements and further details. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

3 quarter credits

 

 

Three Elective Courses

 

 

At least 15 quarter credits

Choose at least three from the following courses:

PSY-R8218
Advanced Residency Applications

Learners enhance their understanding of theory, practice, and research related to the profession by engaging with a specific licensure-related topic(s) in clinical psychology. During the face-to-face residency, learners apply clinical skills to prepare for professional clinical psychology practice. Prerequisite(s): PSY-R8206. Special permission is required for registration.

2 quarter credits
PSY5115
Human Sexuality

This course is an exploration of sexuality within the larger context of human experience, emphasizing physical and psychosexual development, cultural diversity, health-related issues, and the application of scientific information to sexual topics and issues. Current issues include sexual deviation, sexual inadequacy, treatment of sexual problems, trauma, sexual identity, gender identity, and reproductive health care. Learners examine scholarly literature related to the implications of these issues and research evidence-based interventions in human sexuality.

5 quarter credits
PSY5125 *
Introduction to Sex Therapy

Learners in this course gain an understanding of common sexuality concerns including low sexual desire, sexual compulsivity, recovery from sexual abuse, and treatment of sex offenders. Learners analyze strategies for sex therapy and demonstrate competence in cultural elements associated with sex therapy, taking a sex history, and assessment. Prerequisite(s): PSY5115.

5 quarter credits
PSY5135
Issues and Trends in Addiction-Related Treatments

This course presents current addiction research, clinical trends, and substantive field-related issues. Learners use evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence to examine ways of identifying and defining substance-related problems and behaviors with addictive features and to explore pharmacologic and other emerging treatment approaches. Other course topics include managed care, mental health parity, Internet resources used in addiction training and treatment, and the changing role of the counselor in the addiction field.

5 quarter credits
PSY5244
Play Therapy 1: The History and Systems of Play Therapy

In this course, learners examine the historical origins of and rationale for integrating play into the practice of therapy and discuss the core systems of and approaches to play therapy. Learners also review the contributions of play to child development and well being throughout the lifespan. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY5246 *
Play Therapy 2: Theories and Practices of Play Therapy

Learners analyze the major theories and techniques that inform the applications of play in therapy using an interdisciplinary approach and emphasizing related research. Learners investigate key topics such as play materials, developmental and multicultural considerations, ethical and legal issues, and play therapy for all ages and populations. Prerequisite(s): PSY5244. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY6505 *
Principles of Family Psychology

This course is an exploration of family psychology focused on family systems theory, research, and models. Learners examine the emotions, thoughts, and behaviors of individual family members and the structure and function of the family system as a whole. Learners also study styles of family interaction, family boundaries, family roles, and the family lifecycle. Prerequisite(s): PSY6015.

5 quarter credits
PSY6810 *
Principles of Sport Psychology

Learners in this course apply psychological theories to explain and improve sport performance. Learners evaluate the implications of new research for professional practice in sport psychology and explore the ways in which they can meet the unique needs of diverse participants through customized coaching strategies. In particular, learners examine personality, attention, anxiety, arousal and arousal adjustment strategies, cognitive-behavioral intervention, causal attribution, motivation, and self confidence. Prerequisite(s): PSY6110.

5 quarter credits
PSY6820 *
Performance Enhancement in Sports

Learners in this course examine the mechanisms athletes use to exceed their perceived physical and mental limitations. In addition, learners apply performance enhancement theories and techniques to help clients improve athletic performance. Topics include strategies such as visualization, meditation, hypnosis, autogenic training, biofeedback, and progressive relaxation. Prerequisite(s): PSY6810.

5 quarter credits
PSY6830 *
Applied Sport Psychology

Learners in this course acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to apply fundamental sport psychology concepts to their chosen profession. Learners consider ethical issues, their personal approach to sport psychology practice, and ways to use research to inform their work. Learners also examine the significance of working with diverse populations and expanding their areas of expertise. Prerequisite(s): PSY6820.

5 quarter credits
PSY6840 *
Current Issues in Sport Psychology

In this course, learners critically analyze the research, theories, and practices of sport psychology. Learners examine current issues in sports and determine ways to ethically and professionally apply sport psychology practices to educate sports participants and to improve the performance of athletes.  Prerequisite(s): PSY6820.

5 quarter credits
PSY6910 *
Psychology and the Law

Learners investigate the fundamental theoretical, empirical, and ethical bases of forensic psychology and prepares learners for the advanced practical training covered in PSY6920 and PSY6930. Learners develop forensic assessment methodology skills and study psychology’s role in the judicial system, the differences between clinical and forensic psychological practice, and parameters of ethical practice in forensic psychology. Learners also analyze the basic functions of forensic practice in civil, criminal, juvenile, and family law contexts and basic principles of testimony. Prerequisite(s): PSY6210

5 quarter credits
PSY6920 *
Techniques of Forensic Practice

The primary focus of PSY6920 is on the methodology and mechanics for performing different forensic activities including training in methodology. The course also focuses on practical applications and skill-building in different forensic practice areas. The course presents forensic evaluation methodologies including competency to stand trial, insanity defense, child custody, fitness to parent, mitigating defenses, and recidivism. Evaluating malingering and understanding the guidelines for ethical practice are emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): PSY6910.

5 quarter credits
PSY6930 *
Current Issues and Trends in Forensic Practice

Learners in this course analyze current forensic psychology issues and examine appropriate application of scientific methods to forensic situations. Topics include eye-witness identification, legal decision making, forensic assessment and reporting, criminal defenses, profiling, polygraphy, risk assessment, jury composition, scientific jury selection, and other selected topics of interest to both the psychology and legal fields. Prerequisite(s): PSY6210, PSY6910, PSY6920.

5 quarter credits
PSY7330
Psychopharmacology

Learners in this course explore the behavioral and therapeutic effects of psychoactive drugs. Course topics include synaptic transmission, behavioral role of specific neuromodulatory systems, pharmacological treatment of mental and neurological disorders, addiction, the various side effects of psychoactive drugs, and how these may interact with key characteristics such as age or general health. Drug effects on learning, creativity, memory, sleep, perception, and sexual functioning receive special attention. Learners also examine the efficacy of treating patients with a combination of psychotherapy and psychotropic medications for a number of diagnosed mental disorders including depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, obsessive compulsive behavior, schizophrenia, and childhood disorders.

5 quarter credits
PSY7510
Psychology of Personality

This course is an examination of personality development from the perspective of several theoretical orientations: psychodynamic, humanistic/ existential, dispositional, and learning theory. Learners analyze and evaluate these theories and consider how other factors such as culture and gender contribute to personality development. This course also allows learners to apply personality theory to their professional practice.

5 quarter credits
PSY7708
Basic Foundations in Applied Behavior Analysis

In this course, learners gain an understanding of the basic foundations, philosophy, and concepts underlying the science of behavior analysis. Learners differentiate between therapeutic approaches that are behavior-analytic and those that are not. Learners acquire knowledge of the basic principles and analyze behavior and environmental events surrounding the occurrence of behavior. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY7709 *
Advanced Concepts in Applied Behavior Analysis

In this course, learners further examine the concepts underlying the science of behavior analysis. Learners discern the different types of antecedents and consequences that effect behavior. Learners practice speaking in the scientific terminology used in the science of behavior analysis. Learners also gain a basic understanding of Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior. Prerequisite(s): Completion of or concurrent registration in PSY7708. Cannot be fulfilled by transfer.

5 quarter credits
PSY8610
Principles of Health Psychology

Learners in this course examine behavioral and biomedical theory and research in order to gain an understanding of the contributions of psychological factors to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and illness. Learners evaluate research design and the role of research in health psychology and consider the effect of the patient-physician relationship, the importance of interprofessional work, and theories that predict health behaviors. In particular, learners define and explore adherence and psychoneuroimmunology, examine behavior related to the diseases of cancer and hypertension, assess treatment recommendations, and identify coping strategies for the patient and family. In addition, learners investigate prevention and wellness in the contexts of intentional and unintentional injuries and discuss health, life expectancy, and quality of life.

5 quarter credits
PSY8770
Psychology of Motivation and Performance

In this course, learners explore various psychological theories, concepts, and principles of motivation. Learners evaluate the factors of motivation that influence personal and professional performance, success, and satisfaction. Learners also synthesize research in order to identify, assess, and integrate motivational strategies and apply models of performance enhancement.

5 quarter credits

 

 

Total

 

 

At least 145 quarter credits

* Denotes courses that have prerequisite(s). Refer to the descriptions for further details.

Learners who do not complete all program requirements within quarter credit/program point minimums will be required to accrue such additional quarter credits/program points as are associated with any additional or repeat coursework necessary for successful completion of program requirements.

This program is not accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) or by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Capella University cannot guarantee eligibility for licensure, endorsement, other professional credential, or salary advancement. State licensing regulations and professional standards vary; learners are responsible for understanding and complying with the requirements of the state in which they intend to work. For more information, see the professional licensure disclosures for this program on Capella’s website.

PsyD Clinical Psychology Year-in-Residence

For more detailed information on residencies, learners should refer to the Clinical PsyD Program Manual.

PsyD Clinical Training

Overview of Practicum

The practicum is a training experience that occurs in the second or third year of the program and provides the opportunity for learners to receive professional clinical training. Practicum is a part-time, on-site commitment that takes place over a minimum period of nine months and includes registration for the accompanying practicum courses.

All practicum learners must follow the practicum application process and completion guidelines stated in the Clinical PsyD Program Manual, available on Campus. The director of clinical training works closely with learners to identify potential practicum sites in their local community that meet the criteria outlined by the clinical training department. All practicum placements must be approved by the director of clinical training.

Practicum Requirements

• Approved practicum application.

• Part-time site placement with a minimum of 1,000 hours and coursework in a minimum of three quarters of the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Practicum (PSY8950).

Overview of Internship

The pre-doctoral internship is the last opportunity for learners to gain professional clinical experience prior to the granting of the degree. The internship requires a full-time (one year) or part-time (two years) on-site commitment of a minimum of 2,000 hours and includes registration for the accompanying internship course. The predoctoral internship is viewed critically by licensing boards and future employers. All internship learners must follow the internship application process and completion guidelines stated in the Clinical PsyD Program Manual, available on Campus.

Internship Requirements

• Learner demonstrates readiness for internship.

• Approved internship application.

• Full-time site placement with a minimum of 2,000 hours, completed sequentially over a one-year period, or part-time site, two-year placement with a minimum of 2,000 hours, at least 20 hours per week, not to exceed eight sequential quarters, and registration of a minimum of four times in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Internship (PSY9962).

Clinical training hours and supervisor credential requirements for licensure or certification vary across states and Canadian provinces. Learners are responsible for determining the specific licensing requirements for any state or province in which they plan to seek licensure.